Monday, May 25, 2020

Essay on Medical Informatics - 1874 Words

Introduction Healthcare is a large, complicated field facing many issues in America today. The medical profession is becoming ever so complex that it is consistently pushing information technology tools and techniques to newer heights. Knowledge management in healthcare or medical informatics, is one step towards organizing this complex field. Medical Informatics is the sharing and use of information in the delivery of healthcare. It is a growing and exciting field of study with an incredible demand that will continue for many years to come. Demand is so high, many Universities are now offering specialized degrees in this field because there is and will be a large workforce needed to accommodate the needs of this field. Medical†¦show more content†¦They are in the process of addressing the major issues and establishing a National Health Information Network. Many clinics and hospitals, around the world, have been using electronic medical records for years. The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, is a great example and they have â€Å"one of the largest such systems in the world† (Mayo, 2007, para 2). The Mayo Clinic’s EMR system can be accesses on any one of the 16,000 computer terminals on their three campuses. The EMRs include â€Å"everything related to a patient’s care – physician notes, laboratory reports, surgical dictations, copies of correspondence, appointment schedules, x-rays, ultrasounds, CT and MRI scans, and echocardiograms† (Mayo, 2007, para 3). The Mayo Clinic is also constantly working on new technology to improve patient care and generate new knowledge. They believe that the EMRs are â€Å"critical to Mayo’s ability to provide efficient, coordinated, safe and high-quality care† (Mayo, 2007, para 5). They also stated on their website, that they’ve been processing a ll of there new patients through their EMR system since March 21, 2005. Virtual Bedside Many hospitals and emergency rooms have also gone to a new form of medical informatics known as virtual bedside. â€Å"To the extent that electronic mail, discussion forums, electronic knowledge-bases and health data can beShow MoreRelatedMedical Records and the Implementation of Health Informatics1753 Words   |  8 PagesIntroduction Health Informatics or Medical Informatics is the intersection of information science, computer science, and health care. Health Informatics offers resources, devices, and methods required to optimize the acquisition, storage, retrieval, and use of information in health and biomedicine. The applicable areas would be nursing, clinical care, dentistry, pharmacy, public health, and bio medical research. Electronic health information systems are the science that addressesRead MoreMedical Professionals And Facilities Use Technology And Informatics1639 Words   |  7 Pagesenacted in order to have medical professionals and facilities use technology and informatics. Technology in the medical field helps create databases and offer medical professionals a higher level of patient care. Meaningful Use is part of a 2009 law called HITECH, which in turn is part of the American recovery and Reinvestment act . HITECH stands for Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health. Meaningful use is also part of a 3 stage system, that helps medical providers and facilitiesRead MoreHuman Health And The Delivery Of Health Care Services ( American Medical Informatics Association Inc.869 Words   |  4 PagesInformatics as it relates to nursing can be defines as the science of how to use data, information, and knowledge to improve human health and the delivery of health care servi ces (American Medical Informatics Association Inc., 2016). It includes the ability to locate or generate data as well as the storage and sharing of said data. Today, almost our entire society relies on technology in some form or another and the healthcare field is no different. The culture of nursing has changed dramaticallyRead MoreReflection Of Medical Informatics1424 Words   |  6 PagesIntroduction to Biomedical Informatics class, I was very eager and excited to learn the role of biomedical informatics in healthcare organizations and the importance of data capture and analysis in improving public health. One of the major misconceptions I had was that this course would not cover wide range of factors influencing the biomedical informatics field. Much to my surprise, the course provided a comprehensive analysis of factors related to biomedical informatics, including but not limitedRead MoreTaking a Look at Medical Informatics1237 Words   |  5 PagesMedical informatics are sketchily explained as the applied science at the interconnection of the disciplines of medicine, business, information technology, and consumer centered care, wh ich is contributory for substantial and measurable developments in both healthcare quality and cost-effectiveness. Informatics is a compilation of tools, resources, and methods to enhance greater intelligence in use in regards to the latest evidence and knowledge within health and medicine. Computers and informationRead MorePersonal Note On Medical Informatics1087 Words   |  5 Pageshelpful on a emotional front and how to deal with the problem in general.{Nordfeldt S, Hanberger L, Berterà ¶ C. Patient and parent views on a Web 2.0 Diabetes Portal--the management tool, the generator, and the gatekeeper: qualitative study. Journal Of Medical Internet } In addition to a better understanding of the disease, the patient will also be much more involved and more curious in the treatment. This can be in terms of questions to the physician and a better understanding of the diagnosis and theRead MoreHow Biomedical Informatics Is Transforming Healthcare System1717 Words   |  7 PagesHow Biomedical Informatics is Transforming Healthcare System in the United States: Its Advantages, Challenges, and Suggestions to Address the Challenges By Florence F. Odekunle Department of Health Informatics School of Health Related Professions Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey Assignment 1 Fall 2015 In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the application of biomedical informatics in many aspectsRead MoreA Brief Note On Bar Code Technology On A New Electronic Health Record System2081 Words   |  9 PagesImplementing Bar Code Technology in a New Electronic Health Record System â€Å"The United States based Institute of Medicine (IOM) reported in 1999 that at least 44,000 people, and perhaps as many as 98,000 people, die in hospitals each year as a result of medical errors that could have been prevented†¦Ã¢â‚¬  (Anonymous, 2015). When faced with more than a singular sentinel event related to medication administration errors, the organization must begin to look into why this happened and what can be done to preventRead MoreWhat is Nursing Informatics? Essay1207 Words   |  5 Pagespaper is to develop a research question regarding the prevention of spreading bacteria in ICU and to identify databases and search words to collect data by using the continuum of data, information, knowledge, and wisdom . Also, I will describe how informatics can be used to gain wisdom. Clinical Research Question and Metastructures: Data, Information, Knowledge, and Wisdom The key to conducting successful clinical research involves five steps. These steps are: â€Å"asking answerable clinical questionsRead MoreThe Electronic Health Record And Clinical Decision Support824 Words   |  4 Pagesby 81 per cent of physicians in a survey of medical practices in Massachusetts in 2005 (Wormer, B. A., Colavita, P. D., Yokeley, W. T., Bradley, J. 3., Williams, K. B., Walters, A. L., Heniford, B. T., 2015). Change management is a factor when looking into workflow and how it improves. I realize much of this has to do with change and how people adapt to change, but I would like to take a closer look at how the EHR improves the workflow of the medical professionals using the new system. References

Friday, May 15, 2020

Domestic Violence On Women Implications For Child...

Domestic Violence on Women: Implications for Child Protection Introduction Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a worldwide social problem whose perpetrators include men as well as women (Anderson, 2002; Archer, 2000, 2002; Brown, 2004; Capaldi, Kim, Shortt, 2007; Capaldi Owen, 2001; Hamberger Potente, 1994; Straus Gelles, 1986, as cited in Ali Naylor, 2013). For the purpose of this essay, I will discuss IPV faced by women and perpetuated by men, referring to it as domestic violence (DV) and children’s exposure to DV as CEDV. According to Johnson (2011) and Yodanis (2004), â€Å"domestic violence is terror in the home, whereby an adult (mostly a man) exerts power, control, and domination through creating a climate of fear.† (as cited in Wendt, Buchanan, Moulding, 2015, p. 542). In the patriarchal societies of US and Canada, when battered women are involved with child protection, they are often blamed for child neglect and maltreatment while fathers are left invisible in the case analysis (Friend, Shlonsky, Lambert, 2008; Humphreys Absler, 2011; Kaukinen, Powers, Meyer, 2016; Lapierre Cote, 2011; Mandel, 2010; Moulding, Buchanan, Wendt, 2015; Nixon, Tutty, Weaver-Dunlop, Walsh, 2007; Wendt et al., 2015). While the co-occurrence of DV and child maltreatment in families may pose increased risks for children, a deeper understanding may also reflect practice biases towards mothers experiencing DV. Social workers in child protection, therefore, must adopt anShow MoreRelatedChild Victims of Domestic Violence1341 Words   |  6 PagesЕssay Child victims of domestic violence Family today are unfortunately less as a fundamental unit of a healthy society. Almost all countries in the world are faced with the inability to determine the number of victims of kriminalitetot, and especially when such women. According to UN studies, women are the most frequent victims of sexual violence (50%) attacks of personality (10%) and other attacks on property (10%). For nasilonichkiot kriminalitet family largely lacksRead MoreDomestic Violence And Its Effects On Our Society Essay1456 Words   |  6 Pageslong-term consequences. This is especially true of how domestic violence is currently governed by the criminal justice system and social norms. A lack of preventative care exists and this ignores the consequences of domestic violence in our society. Incidents of domestic violence are often treated as one-time or isolated occurrences; however, in many cases abusers and victims fall back into these learnt behaviors. Therefore, domestic violence is a never-ending cycle tha t cannot be stopped withoutRead MoreA Society Of Victims : Understanding And Preventing The Effects Of Domestic Violence Essay1348 Words   |  6 PagesVictims: Understanding and Preventing the Effects of Domestic Violence Domestic Violence has been an ongoing issue since the beginning of time and for centuries, considered a private family matter. While it may have been noticed, it was rarely addressed and intervention was rarely offered to, or accepted by the victim. With the uprising of feminist movements, domestic violence is now recognized as a serious social issue, with the implications of abuse reaching far past the four walls of the privateRead MoreDomestic Violence : The United States Department Of Justice1617 Words   |  7 Pagesdepartment of Justice (2015) defines domestic violence as a â€Å"pattern of abusive behavior in any relationship that is used to by one partner to gain or maintain power and control over another intimate partner†. Domestic violence occurs in every culture, country, and age group. It affects individuals from all socioeconomic, educational, religious backgrounds, and occurs in both same-sex and heterosexual relationships. For this paper I will take a look at how domestic violence affects marriages. I will exploreRead Moredomestic violence act in Uk1627 Words   |  7 Pagesï » ¿Domestic Violence Act in UK Domestic can be defined in many ways but the simplest meaning is ‘involving the home or family’ whereas violence means an ‘act of aggression as one against a person who resist’. In addition, violence does not relate to relationship problem or issue but is social context of reflection of a man overruling woman. It happens to all walks of people in life despite of age, sex, race, assets and cartography. Notwithstanding, scoop by both male and female endure hurts duringRead MoreThe Lecture On Domestic Violence Essay1736 Words   |  7 Pagesexplored the changes and influences of the Domestic Protection Act, 1982 and the Domestic Violence Act, 1996. The presentation put emphasis on the law and systems in dealing with domestic violence. Included also in the lecture, was the analysis of protection orders and police interference. Protection orders are in practice for the urgent safety of the victims of domestic violence. They are applied for through the family c ourt with evidence of domestic violence or potential danger (Morden, 2016). TheRead MoreEssay about Domestic Violence 1016 Words   |  5 Pages Did you know that every 9 seconds a women is being beaten or assaulted? It is known that around the world, at least one and every three women has been beaten into having sex or some rudely thing in her entire lifetime. There are many cases where the abuser is a family member. Domestic violence is that the willful intimidation, physical assault, battery, sex crime, and different abusive behavior perpetrated by an intimate partner against another. It is a virulent disease touching people in eachRead More We Must Work Together to Reduce Domestic Violence1303 Words   |  6 Pages Domestic violence is an act of crime which occurs in domestic household units. It is also known as as spousal abuse or family violence. Domestic violence is not only related to physical abuse but also emotional, sexual, financial, mental and verbal threats. According to ( Human Right Watch, 1995) cited from Macionis, John J., 2008. Domestic violence is defined as bodily harm, usually accompanied by verbal threats and harassment, emotional abuse or the destruction of property as meansRead MoreChild Removal Policy Essay1607 Words   |  7 PagesDomestic violence has a long historical presence in our society. Initially, it was viewed strictly as a family matter. It was an acceptable means for men to discipline their wives and children, who were regarded as little more than man’s property. There was a lack of, if any, legal ramifications for the abuser and, in fact, domestic violence had been previously sanctioned by English Common law (The National Center for Victims of Crime). As the issue infiltrated public consciousness, advocacyRead MoreThe Issue Of Domestic Violence959 Words   |  4 Pagesâ€Å"Mandatory arrest policies oversimplify the issue of domestic violence, offering a one-size-fits-all solution to a comple x social problem† (Zelcer, 2014, p.560). Mandatory arrest laws were created to protect and help victims of domestic violence. However, there have been many issues with this law. Understanding the positive strides made by this law and the negative or unintended consequences allows for a better understanding of mandatory arrest laws and social issues that face society today. Examining

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

William Faulkners Race Essay - 1358 Words

William Faulkners Race Works Cited Missing William Faulkner, the eldest son to parents Murry and Maud Butler Falkner, was born in New Albany, Mississippi in 1897. Although Faulkner was not a keen student in high school, which eventually lead to his dropping out before graduation, he was very enthusiastic about undirected learning. After years of studying independently, Faulkner allowed a friend of his family, Phil Stone, to assist him with his academic vocation. This relationship inspired Faulkner and after a short period spent with the Royal Air Force in 1918 he decided to go to university where he began writing and publishing poetry. In 1924 Stone’s financial assistance helped Faulkner publish a†¦show more content†¦Oxford provided Faulkner with intimate access to the rich character of the rural south which was conscious of its past and separated from the urban-industrial mainstream that Faulkner found very distracting. He wanted to accurately portray life in the south and he â€Å"could not have done other wise than to include Blacks among the people who inhabit the lands of his novels†(Glissant, pp. 56). Faulkner did not pretend to understand the suffering and complexity of the lives of the black community but, because he grew up witnessing their struggle he was able to represent them in an honest and sometimes brutal fashion. He spent his whole life in the south and, â€Å"Blacks lived there †¦ They were servants in the Falkner family or perhaps workers for the railroad company founded by his great grand-father. They were surely mule drivers or farm laborers †¦Ã¢â‚¬ (Urgo and Abadie, pp. 137). It is difficult to say whether or not Faulkner felt sympathy for these people but it is clear through Faulkner’s writing that he believed their story needed to be told. It is easy to understand why Faulkner included Black characters in his novels, however, the question of how he portrays them still remains. In 1929, inspired by the unavoidable racial intermingling occurring in the south at this time, Faulkner produced one of his greatest works, The Sound and The Fury. In the fourthShow MoreRelatedRace Relations and Environmental Destruction in William Faulkners Go Down, Moses 835 Words   |  3 Pagescontinues with an insatiable hunger to rule over other human beings. William Faulkner, in his novel Go Down, Moses, explores the racial tensions and disastrous environmental results that arose in the South when humankind, believing in this lie, tried to dominate and capitalize off nature and its fellow man. Faulkner attributes the decline of the American South to its economic exploitations and its racial oppression. In â€Å"Touching Race in Go Down, Moses† John T. Matthews argues that these two elementsRead More William Faulkner Essay1215 Words   |  5 Pages William Faulkner nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;William Faulkner is one of Americas most talked about writers and his work should be included in any literary canon for several reasons. After reading a few of his short stories, it becomes clear that Faulkners works have uniqueness to them. One of the qualities that make William Faulkners writings different is his close connection with the South. Gwendolyn Charbnier states, Besides the sociological factors that influence Faulkners work, biographicalRead MoreEssay about William Faulkner1303 Words   |  6 Pages William Faulkner nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp; Although leading the life of an educated writer William Culbert Faulkner experienced the times of his life as a Hollywood writer. Probably known as the most famous writer/author of his time Faulkner adapted to his new lifestyles rapidly, and still remained well known in both the movie and book industries. nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;Faulkner was born September 25, 1897 in New Albany, Mississippi. His named was inherited from his grandfather WilliamRead More Race, gender and class in Faulkners Literature Essay862 Words   |  4 PagesWilliam Faulkner’s short story A Rose for Emily depicts the need for a hierarchy by which to rank and organize individuals by merit of their importance. Class, gender and race each play a vital role in determining the interactions of Jefferson’s residents. Notably, these issues affect how Emily Grierson, Homer Barron, and Emily’s Negro servant Tobe are treated by the townspeople, as well as their behavior. Together race, gender and class portray and define the characters for who they are and actRead MoreEssay about Faulkners Condemnation of the South in Absalom, Absalom1353 Words   |  6 PagesFaulkners Condemnation of the South in Absalom, Absalom       William Faulkner came from an old, proud, and distinguished Mississippi family, which included a governor, a colonel in the Confederate army, and notable business pioneers.   Through his experiences from growing up in the old South, Faulkner has been able to express the values of the South through his characters. William Faulkners Absalom, Absalom offers a strong condemnation of the mores and morals of theRead MoreIntruder in the Dust806 Words   |  4 PagesIn William Faulkner’s novel, Intruder in the Dust, racism at the beginning of the civil rights movement is a key theme. During this time period in the South, people were expected to behave a certain way towards those whose skin was different form their own. However, in this novel, William Faulkner defies the norm by creating friendships between those of opposing races. The friendships between Charles Mallison and Lucas Beauchamp, Miss Eunice Habersham and Molly Beauchamp, and Charles Mallison andRead MoreThe Past Is Not Dead Essay1407 Words   |  6 PagesThe Past is NOT Dead Octavia E. Butler’s Kindred is a novel that perfectly channels the mean of William Faulkner s claim that the past is not dead; it s not even past.† To me this quote basically means that the past cannot become the past because events keep repeating throughout history. This quote is shown to us through Butler drawing upon the history of transatlantic slavery to illustrate certain ideas and behaviors that are seen throughout time. These ideas and behaviors are specifically seenRead More Crossing the Line in Faulkners Barn Burning Essay970 Words   |  4 PagesCrossing the Line in Faulkners Barn Burning   Ã‚  Ã‚   The American author Joyce Carol Oats, in her Master Race, wrote that our enemy is by tradition our savior (Oats 28).   Oats recognized that we often learn more from our enemy than from ourselves.   Whether the enemy is another warring nation, a more prolific writer, or even the person next door, we often can ascertain a tremendous amount of knowledge by studying that opposite party.   In the same way, literature has always striven to provide anRead More The Other Victim in William Faulkner’s Dry September Essay1710 Words   |  7 PagesThe Other Victim in William Faulkner’s Dry September William Faulkner’s short story Dry September deals with a lynching of a black man, Will Mayes, wrongly accused of attacking a white woman, Minnie Cooper. But Mayes is not the only victim in this short story. Minnie Cooper is also a victim in Dry September. Minnie is as much a victim of the social standards and practices of southern society as Willie Mayes is. While Dry September may seem to be just a story about how a black man is wronglyRead MoreUnderstanding Faulkner s Madness By William Faulkner1385 Words   |  6 PagesUnderstanding Faulkner’s Madness William Faulkner s â€Å" A Rose for Emily † illustrates the extremes that someone may be driven to in the face of the â€Å" loveless † life that Miss Emily’s father created for her by driving away all the potential suitors. The major and minor events in the story help develop the plot idea that in the progress from an aristocratic but romanticized past to a more egalitarian present and future. Emily represents the standards and attitudes of the old south, and her inability

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Emotion Over Reason Frankenstein and The Great Gatsby free essay sample

Duff Brenna once said, â€Å"All literature shows us the power of emotion. It is emotion, not reason, that motivates characters in literature. † This means characters in literature are prompted to follow their true emotions instead of their own reasoning. This is true as demonstrated in the two works, Frankentein by Mary Shelley and The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Characters follow their hearts rather than their minds, which is usually the reason behind their actions. In Frankentein, the monster’s actions are driven by emotions. This is evident when the story is told from the monster’s perspective. When first created, the being was abandoned by his creator, Victor. This hurts the monster emotionally because he cared for his creator and yet he was abandoned. When tries to integrate himself into society but is shunned and outcasted, this adds to the monster’s hurt and loneliness. The monster did not intend to hurt anyone, but a boy who was mocking him revealed himself to be William Frankenstein which is Victor’s younger brother. We will write a custom essay sample on Emotion Over Reason: Frankenstein and The Great Gatsby or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page Due to the rage at his creator’s indifference, the monster killed the boy. The monster wants Victor to feel remorse for his actions and does this by hurting his loved ones. When he finds Victor’s body on the ship, he cries and then leaves to build a funeral pyre and die. In the novel, The Great Gatsby, Jay Gatsby wants Daisy because his whole life is devoted to a fulfillment of a romantic dream he created at an earlier age. Gatsby wants Daisy to say she never loved Tom and they could go on living happily together. Through Gatsby’s emotions of desire, love, and hope he has created an image of Daisy in his mind which Daisy can never live up to. These emotions lead him to become successful and rich, throw elaborate parties to try and lead Daisy to him, and much more. His emotions drive his obsessions throughout his life. Both Jay Gatsby and the monster act on pure emotions. Neither one uses reason to determine what they should do. Emotions such as rage, hurt, desire, hope, and love drive these characters to do what they think is right. Their hearts make the decisions, not their minds. Emotions are what motivate characters in literature and can they be very powerful in doing so.

Saturday, April 11, 2020

The Physics Of Scuba Diving Swimming with the Fis Essay Example For Students

The Physics Of Scuba Diving: Swimming with the Fis Essay h Have you ever wondered what it would be like to swim with the fish and explore the underwater jungle that covers two-thirds of the earths surface? I have always been interested in water activities; swimming, diving and skiing, and I felt that scuba was for me. My first dive took place while on a family vacation. I came across a dive shop offering introductory dives, which immediately caught my interest. After much convincing (my parents), with my solemn assurance that I would be careful, I was allowed to participate in a dive. I was ready, or so I thought. We will write a custom essay on The Physics Of Scuba Diving: Swimming with the Fis specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now The slim basics such as breathing were explained and I was literally tossed in. Sounds easy enough, right!, well WRONG!!. From the moment I hit the water, my experience was much less than fun. I quickly sank to the bottom into a new world, with unfamiliar dangers. I really wasnt ready for this experience. I was disorientated, causing me to panic, which shortened the length of my dive, not to mention my air supply. Lets just say I would not do that again. To start exploring the underwater world, one must first master a few skills. Certification is the first step of learning to dive. From qualified professionals one must learn how to use the equipment, safety precautions, and the best places to dive. This paper is designed to help give a general understanding of the sport and the importance that physics plays in it. Self- contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus, or SCUBA for short, is a hell of a lot of fun. However, there is considerably more to Diving than just putting on a wetsuit and strapping some compressed air onto ones back. As I quickly learned, diving safely requires quite a bit more in terms of time, effort, and preparation. When one goes underwater, a diver is introduced to a new and unfamiliar world, where many dangers exist, but can be avoided with proper lessons and understanding. With this knowledge the water is ours to discover. The Evolution of Scuba Diving Divers have penetrated the oceans through the centuries for the purpose of acquiring food, searching for treasure, carrying out military operations, performing scientific research and exploration, and enjoying the aquatic environment. Bachrach (1982) identified the following five principal periods in the history of diving which are currently in use. Free (or breath-hold) diving, bell diving, surface support or helmet (hard hat) diving, scuba diving, and, saturation diving or atmospheric diving (Ketels, 4) SCUBA DIVING The development of self-contained underwater breathing apparatus provided the free moving diver with a portable air supply which, although finite in comparison with the unlimited air supply available to the helmet diver, allowed for mobility. Scuba diving is the most frequently used mode in recreational diving and, in various forms, is also widely used to perform underwater work for military, scientific, and commercial purposes. There were many steps in the development of a successful self-contained underwater system. In 1808, Freiderich yon Drieberg invented a bellows-in-a-box device that was worn on the divers back and delivered compressed air from the surface. This device, named Triton, did not actually work but served to suggest that compressed air could be used in diving, an idea initially conceived of by Halley in 1716. (Ketels, 9) In 1865, two French inventors, Rouquayrol and Denayrouse, developed a suit that they described as self-contained. In fact, their suit was not self contained but consisted of a helmet-using surface-supported system that had an air reservoir that was carried on the divers back and was sufficient to provide one breathing cycle on demand. The demand valve regulator was used with surface supply largely because tanks of adequate strength were not yet available to handle air at high pressure. This systems demand valve, which was automatically controlled, represented a major breakthrough because it permitted the diver to have a breath of air when needed. The Rouquayrol and Denayrouse apparatus was described with remarkable accuracy in Jules Vernes classic, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under The Sea, which was written in 1869, only 4 years after the inventors had made their device public (Ketels, 10). .ua96b85575b54bbe30512b24649449874 , .ua96b85575b54bbe30512b24649449874 .postImageUrl , .ua96b85575b54bbe30512b24649449874 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .ua96b85575b54bbe30512b24649449874 , .ua96b85575b54bbe30512b24649449874:hover , .ua96b85575b54bbe30512b24649449874:visited , .ua96b85575b54bbe30512b24649449874:active { border:0!important; } .ua96b85575b54bbe30512b24649449874 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .ua96b85575b54bbe30512b24649449874 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .ua96b85575b54bbe30512b24649449874:active , .ua96b85575b54bbe30512b24649449874:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .ua96b85575b54bbe30512b24649449874 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .ua96b85575b54bbe30512b24649449874 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .ua96b85575b54bbe30512b24649449874 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .ua96b85575b54bbe30512b24649449874 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .ua96b85575b54bbe30512b24649449874:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .ua96b85575b54bbe30512b24649449874 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .ua96b85575b54bbe30512b24649449874 .ua96b85575b54bbe30512b24649449874-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .ua96b85575b54bbe30512b24649449874:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: AIDS and HIV misc 12 00 EssaySemi-Self-Contained Diving Suit The demand valve played a critical part in the later development of one form of scuba apparatus. In the 1920s, a French naval officer, Captain Yves Le Prieur, began work on a self-contained air diving apparatus that resulted in 1926 in the award of a patent, shared with his countryman Fernez. This device was a steel cylinder containing compressed air that . The Physics Of Scuba Diving Swimming with the Fis Essay Example For Students The Physics Of Scuba Diving: Swimming with the Fis Essay h The Physics Of Scuba Diving: Swimming with the Fis Essayh Have you ever wondered what it would be like to swim with the fish and explore the underwater jungle that covers two-thirds of the earths surface? I have always been interested in water activities; swimming, diving and skiing, and I felt that scuba was for me. My first dive took place while on a family vacation. I came across a dive shop offering introductory dives, which immediately caught my interest. After much convincing (my parents), with my solemn assurance that I would be careful, I was allowed to participate in a dive. I was ready, or so I thought. We will write a custom essay on The Physics Of Scuba Diving: Swimming with the Fis specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now The slim basics such as breathing were explained and I was literally tossed in. Sounds easy enough, right!, well WRONG!!. From the moment I hit the water, my experience was much less than fun. I quickly sank to the bottom into a new world, with unfamiliar dangers. I really wasnt ready for this experience. I was disorientated, causing me to panic, which shortened the length of my dive, not to mention my air supply. Lets just say I would not do that again. To start exploring the underwater world, one must first master a few skills. Certification is the first step of learning to dive. From qualified professionals one must learn how to use the equipment, safety precautions, and the best places to dive. This paper is designed to help give a general understanding of the sport and the importance that physics plays in it. Self- contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus, or SCUBA for short, is a hell of a lot of fun. However, there is considerably more to Diving than just putting on a wetsuit and strapping some compressed air onto ones back. As I quickly learned, diving safely requires quite a bit more in terms of time, effort, and preparation. When one goes underwater, a diver is introduced to a new and unfamiliar world, where many dangers exist, but can be avoided with proper lessons and understanding. With this knowledge the water is ours to discover. The Evolution of Scuba Diving Divers have penetrated the oceans through the centuries for the purpose of acquiring food, searching for treasure, carrying out military operations, performing scientific research and exploration, and enjoying the aquatic environment. Bachrach (1982) identified the following five principal periods in the history of diving which are currently in use. Free (or breath-hold) diving, bell diving, surface support or helmet (hard hat) diving, scuba diving, and, saturation diving or atmospheric diving (Ketels, 4) SCUBA DIVING The development of self-contained underwater breathing apparatus provided the free moving diver with a portable air supply which, although finite in comparison with the unlimited air supply available to the helmet diver, allowed for mobility. Scuba diving is the most frequently used mode in recreational diving and, in various forms, is also widely used to perform underwater work for military, scientific, and commercial purposes. There were many steps in the development of a successful self-contained underwater system. In 1808, Freiderich yon Drieberg invented a bellows-in-a-box device that was worn on the divers back and delivered compressed air from the surface. This device, named Triton, did not actually work but served to suggest that compressed air could be used in diving, an idea initially conceived of by Halley in 1716. (Ketels, 9) In 1865, two French inventors, Rouquayrol and Denayrouse, developed a suit that they described as self-contained. In fact, their suit was not self contained but consisted of a helmet-using surface-supported system that had an air reservoir that was carried on the divers back and was sufficient to provide one breathing cycle on demand. The demand valve regulator was used with surface supply largely because tanks of adequate strength were not yet available to handle air at high pressure. This systems demand valve, which was automatically controlled, represented a major breakthrough because it permitted the diver to have a breath of air when needed. The Rouquayrol and Denayrouse apparatus was described with remarkable accuracy in Jules Vernes classic, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under The Sea, which was written in 1869, only 4 years after the inventors had made their device public (Ketels, 10). .u802412f75d4bf43d19432de1406c7c2a , .u802412f75d4bf43d19432de1406c7c2a .postImageUrl , .u802412f75d4bf43d19432de1406c7c2a .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u802412f75d4bf43d19432de1406c7c2a , .u802412f75d4bf43d19432de1406c7c2a:hover , .u802412f75d4bf43d19432de1406c7c2a:visited , .u802412f75d4bf43d19432de1406c7c2a:active { border:0!important; } .u802412f75d4bf43d19432de1406c7c2a .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u802412f75d4bf43d19432de1406c7c2a { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u802412f75d4bf43d19432de1406c7c2a:active , .u802412f75d4bf43d19432de1406c7c2a:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u802412f75d4bf43d19432de1406c7c2a .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u802412f75d4bf43d19432de1406c7c2a .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u802412f75d4bf43d19432de1406c7c2a .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u802412f75d4bf43d19432de1406c7c2a .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u802412f75d4bf43d19432de1406c7c2a:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u802412f75d4bf43d19432de1406c7c2a .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u802412f75d4bf43d19432de1406c7c2a .u802412f75d4bf43d19432de1406c7c2a-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u802412f75d4bf43d19432de1406c7c2a:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Delusional Disorder Treatments EssaySemi-Self-Contained Diving Suit The demand valve played a critical part in the later development of one form of scuba apparatus. In the 1920s, a French naval officer, Captain Yves Le Prieur, began work on a self-contained air diving apparatus that resulted in 1926 in the award of a patent, shared with his countryman Fernez. This .

Tuesday, March 10, 2020

What is the Worst Song in the World

What is the Worst Song in the World The Worst Song in the World The Era of Good Music The 20th century blessed the world with so much great music – from jazz to blues, rock, and roll to funk. That may not be a case with 21st-century music, but that’s another story altogether. Last century was a revolutionary time in western culture, as well as other parts of the world, and it produced some extraordinary art, including music. However, not everything produced was solid-gold music. Just look at John Mellencamp’s 1985 hit â€Å"Small Town.† It is easily one of the worst songs ever made. Not only is the song a big let down, it’s also repetitive, and it’s glorifying small-town mentalities, lifestyles and limitations almost to the point of condescension. In no way, shape or form is the song a good one; rather, it is surely one that should never be played or listened to ever again on the public radio. Guitar Rhythm Going Nowhere For starters, â€Å"Small Town† could be considered the worst song in the world because it’s one big disappointment after another. It’s a catchy intro, the guitar rhythm, but it seems to go nowhere. It illustrates that silly, simple drumbeat typical of music from the 1980s, which is all just terrible; except for anything by bluesman Stevie Ray Vaughan, which is absolutely excellent. But Mellencamp’s â€Å"Small Town† is just a small-minded song that is barely a song. It’s mostly a bunch of shoddy lyrics backed by even lamer music. It’s the worst song in the world, and it clearly was an expedient effort to get paid. Secondly, and most importantly, it’s the worst song in the world because it can drive anyone nuts with its mindless repetition. It lacks creativity, originality, and diversity. In just seven stanzas – it has six four-line stanzas, and one five-line stanza – Mellencamp says the world â€Å"small town† 17 times – again, 17 times! It’s so annoyingly redundant that the listener has no choice but to anticipate him saying it, almost to the point of an anguishing dread. Some of the better songs have diverse choruses, interesting phrases. But, no, Mellencamp went a different route. How it reached number six on the Billboard Hot 100 chart is surely a mystery that no cultural expert or art critic could explain. If anything, it alludes to the sheer idiocy of the 1980s – with its hair-metal bands, outlandish behavior, and working-class sensationalism. Too Depressive Song Thirdly, that latter point brings up another reason why â€Å"Small Town† is so horrible, probably one of the worst songs ever made: It clearly is pandering to a demographic – the small-town natives with their small-town mentalities – that it’s more depressing than encouraging. In the second stanza, he sings, â€Å"All my friends are so small town/My parents live in the same small town/My job is so small town.† Now it’s quite a challenge to look beyond the sheer, mindless redundancy of the lyrics, but he sings like he is celebrating the small-town life while making fun of it. He is a sort of condescending. And yet, Mellencamp left the â€Å"small town† to become a â€Å"big† star. In a sense, he is making fun of the dumb people buying his album, who thinks he is glorifying them and their lifestyles. But that is not the case. It is essentially Mellencamp catering to this poor, working-class demographic, knowing he can easily get them to buy his new album. It’s basically marketing at its finest, a business effort to make money. Only, art and music are these beautiful gifts that should never be used as tools to merely make money. â€Å"Small Town† did just that, and it should not be considered a good song. It should be seen as one of the worst songs – if not the worst song – ever made. To conclude, every time Mellencamp hears â€Å"Small Town† on the radio, he probably cringes, lights a cigarette and promptly changes the station. In fact, he has likely removed every single radio his family owns, whether in cars, unused rooms, everywhere that could house a radio, and replace them all with iPods of only his greatest hits. â€Å"Small Town,† because of its disappointing, repetitive, trolling, sold-out nature, is assuredly the worst song on the face of the Earth. It should be banned from universities, public libraries, and hospitals. It has no place in American culture, no place in the lives of hard-working, decently intelligent people – and we should make sure children grow up never hearing of such a terrible, soul-sucking song.

Sunday, February 23, 2020

Information System Risk Management Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1750 words

Information System Risk Management - Essay Example This is because success of the ERPs depends on many factors which include technological (Hardware and software), efficient design of processes, and utilization of human recourses. The human resources are the users of the new ERP solution. It is with this in mind that organizations should take risk management strategy that would identify and also control any ERP implementation risks. An organization at risk is exposed to potential threats. Risk management comprises of risk assessment, risk mitigation evaluation and assessment. Risk assessment is used to determine extent of the potential. Some tangible impacts of the success of a threat are thins like loss of revenue and the cost of repairing a system that has been affected (Stoneburner, 2008). Security Threats-ERP threats are real therefore it is important not only to identify the threats but also know the vulnerabilities of the system and look for ways of preventing these threats from breaching the security of the ERP system. The threats may be grouped into the types which include the following:- 3.0 Natural Threats-These are threats that are not caused by human beings. They include quakes, floods, tornadoes, hurricanes, temperature extremes, and many others. Intentional Threats-The best examples of intentional threats are computer crimes or purposeful damage of property or even information. Unintentional Threats-These threats may include unauthorized or even accidental modification of the system. The best way is to study the vulnerability of the system is to identify the threats and then examine the system under those threats. 4.0 Vulnerability of the system One has to think about business transactions that can lead to losses from the information system based abuse, fraud and errors. This may lead to losses occurring when users use the system in a manner that they are not supposed to. It may either be intentional or not. Also there may be threats from intrusion and attacks from outsiders. People may steal or come across authorization credentials and try to enter the system without the knowledge of the authorities and thus jeopardize the integrity of the information contained in the system database. In addition there may also be systems abuse and fraud from the insiders. Authorized users can attempt and indeed succeed in entering into modules that they are not supposed to enter. Centralization of everything in the organization can become a performance bottleneck and also increase the ease with which people can sabotage the entire operations of the organization. One only needs to ensure that the ERP is not w orking and the organization will be on its knees unable to operate. 5.0 External Security Threats Weak Passwords- By use of dictionary attacks, intruders can guess correctly the passwords that are used in the ERP system and hence cause a malicious damage to the system or even get access to otherwise confidential data of the organization thereby compromising the integrity of the organization data. To eliminate this kind of threat, the organization should provide complex passwords and combine